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Interviews

We’ll be soaring again soon

It’ll take more than a global pandemic to stop Accessible Dreams drawing up plans for more empowering trips in the not-too-distant future, as NR Times reports.

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Two of the most powerful ingredients of Accessible Dreams’ work are the very things that are restricted right now.

Travelling to exciting horizons, and being able to hang out with friends new and old once there, are at the heart of the experiences the group creates.

And at the time of writing, one is currently impossible from the UK, while the other is enabled only in a world of separation, screens and clever apps.

But Nicola Cale, who runs Accessible Dreams, sounds surprisingly chipper when NR Times calls her.

Partly, she’s been bowled over by the enthusiasm and ingenuity shown by people in the group’s vast social ecosystem in staying connected and supporting each other.

But also, it’s given her a chance to reflect on the importance of the organisation’s work – and she can’t wait to help more clients onto the adventure trail with renewed vigour soon.

Accessible Dreams welcomes people with serious injuries and often complex disabilities into life-changing overseas experiences, like skiing, surfing and safaris.

Many individuals it works with would otherwise have given up on the possibility of such adventures because of the challenges created by their condition or injury. In reversing this, magical things can happen.

Nicola, who runs the organisation alongside fellow director William Sargent, says: “Going out and being in a different environment stimulates the brain differently. Being on the mountains, for example, already changes your outlook, so if you have a brain injury or disability and your world’s become a lot smaller, to change your environment is really important.

“So too are the opportunities to socialise with others in a group which looks beyond disability.

“Making friends with other people who may be struggling with different challenges in life can be empowering and help clients to better deal with their own difficulties.”

​Through its annual trips, Accessible Dreams enables people to rediscover, or even discover for the first time, the social benefits of group travel and exploring the world alongside the challenge of the physical activity.

“The main thinking behind it is to show them that life can be good again. While a person might not be able to ski or surf in the same way they used to, we want to help them discover they can still do it.

“We’re not focusing on disability, we’re looking at what we can do, what can be possible. We want to show people that their dream is accessible and make adventures which are often assumed to be beyond reach become reality.”

Coronavirus travel restrictions unfortunately led to the group’s annual safari trip being postponed, although Nicola is hoping surfing can still take place later in
the year.

And, with skiing still scheduled for February and March 2021, planning and the search for new opportunities behind the scenes is in full flow.

The three services offered by Accessible Dreams – organised trips, helping people to plan their own holiday and supplying a crew member ‘chaperone’ to join a holiday – are still proving as in-demand as ever.

Despite all future travel being clouded in uncertainty, Nicola believes the current enforced isolation has only galvanised people in their desire to see more of the world.

“I have a theory, I can’t prove it, but it’s a theory of mine, that good brain chemistry can build new neural pathways. If you’re stressed and your daily routine
is the same all the time, you’re not making new connections in your brain, whereas if you’re going out doing new things, your senses are heightened.

“So it’s important that we continue to focus on that huge difference travelling can make and look to the future to get our plans back on track for later this year and next year onwards.

“Taking people on holiday, or using our resources and connections to help is absolutely something to look forward to and be excited about.”

Over the course of the many trips organised so far, Nicole has witnessed a steady stream of success stories from people who have fulfilled personal dreams, while changing their outlook on life.

On the most recent skiing trip, which saw 66 people visiting a French ski resort, a man who suffered a brain injury several years ago, which left him with very limited powers of communication, went skiing for the first time since his injury.

That huge achievement was compounded by the fact his support worker and friend was also able to join him.

“This particular guy used to be in the Army and we knew he was an adrenaline junkie before his brain injury.

“So we arranged for him to ski down the mountain in a sit ski. We found out that his support worker used to be in the military with him, so we arranged for him to go in a sit ski too.

“That was a special moment. It’s a cliché but you could see him light up, he was visibly brighter in his eyes, and also more upbeat afterwards.

“We also have a blind man who has now been on four ski trips with us and has learned to ski standing up. It’s incredible that he’s learned this new skill.

“That feeling of exhilaration, the speed and perception of danger – even though in reality it’s the safest it could be – has a really special impact on people.”

While the trips are primarily for the benefit of the person with the serious injury or disability, they can be equally important for family members and support workers too, says Nicola.

“You can see sometimes they’re a bit nervous about going on trips, so that’s why we offer the range of services we do, either arranging the holiday, helping to arrange someone’s own holiday, or having someone to send with you.

“Seeing a loved one being able to ski or surf and seeing the difference that makes to them, can be very emotional.

“I had one lady recently tell me that going on one of our trips with her son helped her to let go a little bit as a mother and to realise that people really did care – and that it was OK for her to take a step back. I thought that was brilliant.

“Her son also said about travelling as a group, ‘We went as strangers and came back as friends’ and that’s exactly what we want to achieve.

“We see it as building a community of people who have mutual experiences and common loves, and we have set up a WhatsApp group for people who are travelling so they can keep in touch afterwards. That’s been a really nice more recent addition to what we do.”

Each trip organised by Accessible Dreams is meticulously planned according to the bespoke needs of the participants.

“We want to take people to places that are unusual and appealing, but on a practical level, we make sure that whichever adventure we go on, there is a great hospital or medical centre nearby, and of course make sure the resort we go to meets our needs exactly.

“The ski resort in France we visit now knows us. They’ve got great resources, but we’ve also made sure their ski instructors are clued up on brain injury and have taught them about brain injury awareness.

“Also, we add in other aspects which are tailored for the group, such as having a rest day after a travel day.

“These are the sorts of things that package holidays don’t really factor in. So we might make a holiday for ten days instead of seven to allow some extra time getting over fatigue.”

Plans are also underway for trips, including those within the UK, that provide a more relaxing alternative to adrenaline-packed holidays.

Nicola is also hoping to arrange high-octane day trips as soon as the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

“If someone wanted to do a skydive, for example, we could look at that.

“There are also opportunities for cycling or walking holidays closer to home and we’ve got links to some adapted properties in the UK which could help with that.

“Also, we ran a fantastic ‘sensation’ vacation to France, with some alternative therapists joining us.

“We had good food, aromatic essential oils and all kinds of other things that indulged the senses of taste, touch and smell. That’s something we could look at doing in the UK once we’re allowed to move around again.”

Accessible Dreams has long been in the business of overcoming seemingly unscalable barriers. It looks like the current crisis will be just another challenge it rises to and ultimately leaves for dust on the road to another adventure.

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Interviews

Inspiring a brighter future for residents

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A neuro-rehab provider which opened its first facility in Worcester shortly before the first lockdown has succeeded against the odds – and now has plans to expand in 2021, as NR Times reports.

Inspire Neurocare provides support for people with a variety of neurological conditions, offering rehabilitation, respite and palliative care.

The firm opened its first specialist care centre in Worcester in February 2020, and this will be followed by further facilities in Basingstoke and Southampton in 2021/22. Inspire prides itself on a novel model of care that has “no limitations on the possibility of recovery,” all led by director of clinical excellence Michelle Kudhail.

A key element of the centre’s approach is the team’s commitment to understanding that every patient, and the circumstances that led them there, is different.

Whether this means enabling people to leave high dependency hospital units and develop their independence in a modern, home-from-home environment, or providing long-term support or end-of-life care, the service is designed to work around the needs of each patient.

Michelle’s background means she is the ideal person to head up the Inspire team, having worked as a neuro physiotherapist in the NHS until 2010, before moving into the private sector.

Michelle Kudhail, director of clinical excellence at Inspire Neurocare.

She takes an holistic approach to patient care, which has led to the creation of a team of life skills
facilitators and therapists at the provider, who develop their care around the needs of everyone.

“The life skills facilitators support and assist the residents to do as much as they can for themselves,” she explains.

“As the name suggests, their role is more than a carer; it is to facilitate the residents in all aspects of their care, whether that’s helping them get their breakfast, choosing what they are going to wear, or taking their medication.

“Their skills are broad because we want them to be involved in all aspects of the residents’ care; and because we want to provide what they need at the time that they need it.

“Roles such as this also enable us to evaluate the outcome of any action. If a resident has been given pain medication, a facilitator can assess whether it’s been effective, rather than a nurse giving the medication and then not seeing them until the next round.

“We also know from a therapy perspective that some patients don’t respond well to having therapy at a fixed time on a particular day; they simply might not feel like doing it. Our facilitators mean we can best provide interventions for the resident when they want them.”

Alongside this role, the facility also employs a wellbeing and lifestyle coach, focussing on the health and emotional needs of both residents and their relatives, particularly during a time when COVID has caused a lot of uncertainty.

Michelle says: “We wanted somebody that had relevant experience in working with residents, particularly with neurological conditions but also with a well-rounded experience so that they would not just focus on one aspect.

“The idea is to have somebody who can offer support in all areas, whether it be psychological, emotional or physical.”

Staff are overseen by experienced rehabilitation consultant Dr Damon Hoad, who shares his clinical oversight with the interdisciplinary team and supports patients on their journeys.

The rest of the clinical team have a wealth of experience within neuro services in and around the region.

The design of the Worcester facility draws on Michelle’s years of experience, and she had the opportunity to use her skills to help develop the purpose-built home.

She says: “We’ve had a lot of involvement all the way through from knocking down the pub that was there, to seeing it grow. Having the opportunity to be involved from the ground up was fantastic.

“Within the build itself we try to consider the needs of younger people, and so the inside of the home is very much a contemporary design and a lot of research has gone into its development to ensure it has the correct, up to date, equipment.”

Adding to the sense of autonomy staff are keen to foster, is the independent living flat, which staff are able to support via environmental controls.

With soundproofed rooms, residents can enjoy listening to music or watching films without disturbing others.

In common with all care facilities, the impact of COVID means that a lot of thought has had to go into the long-term plans for the property. The recently-built visitation suite – known as the ‘family and friends lounge’ – allows visitors to meet their loved ones in a safe and COVID-compliant way.

The suite includes separate access for visitors from outside, and features a large transparent Perspex screen separating each side of the suite, while an intercom enables contact-free communication.

As well as creating an infection barrier, the screen also assists when it comes to residents who may struggle to understand that they are unable to hug their relatives, while still allowing them to communicate and see each other up close.

After each visit, the room is cleaned and decontaminated in preparation for the next visit.

As Michelle explains, human contact is essential for emotional wellbeing, adding: “We’ve tried to create an environment that is as safe as possible, because we know how important visits are to the residents but, more particularly, to their relatives.

“Supporting the residents through this time is vital. We have residents that are used to going out and doing things in the community and we have had to adjust by being creative in the ways in which they can still access things that they enjoy and still communicate with their families.”

And while the pandemic has certainly delivered some challenges, Michelle and the Inspire team have been able to look at some positive outcomes.

She explains: “One of the positives for us is that it gave the team and the residents the opportunity to really get to know each other.

“We could also develop the life skills facilitator role to its truest form, because everybody was very much working together dealing with the crisis, supporting each other and supporting the residents.

“It was a testing time but it actually it brought the team together, bearing in mind the facility opened literally as everything was going into lockdown.”

The creation of the COVID-secure visitation suite is just one example of the creativity with which all at Inspire approach care, Michelle says.

By looking to build collaborations with other organisations, Michelle also hopes to share her hard-won knowledge, potentially becoming involved in research and training in the future.

Despite the upheaval of its first few months, the Inspire team has already achieved some successful patient outcomes.

One such success story is the case of Adrian, who came to the centre for specialist neuro-rehab following a car accident in which he suffered a severe brain injury. In the months that followed, Adrian’s journey enabled him to walk out of the service and return home to his wife and children.

(See Adrian’s story below – and read more here).

While the coming months may bring more challenges, as COVID lingers and vaccinations are rolled out, the Inspire team seemingly has the skills, approach and dedication to rise to whatever the future holds.

www.inspireneurocare.co.uk

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Case management

‘I’d never imagined using Zoom as part of my physio placement’

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Tabitha Pridham is a third year student at Keele University. 

Every aspect of neurophysiotherapy has had to adapt with the onset of COVID-19, including how students prepare for a career in the profession. Here, student Tabitha Pridham discusses her experience of a pandemic placement.

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the concept of physiotherapists routinely holding sessions with clients remotely was quite  unlikely.

While used to some degree in a small number of practices nationally, telerehab, as it has now become widely known, was not on the agenda of many.

But due to its seismic rise during the past few months, with physios realising the potential of digital and virtual means to see clients when meeting in person isn’t possible, it seems telerehab is here to stay. 

While it was never part of the studies of aspiring physiotherapists, they are now having to adapt to something that will most likely be part of their future careers.

“The very nature of physiotherapy is that it is hands on, so it seemed really strange to me at first that we would be using Zoom to do online physiotherapy,” says Tabitha Pridham, a third year student at Keele University.

“But I have seen how useful it can be, particularly for those patients who are very advanced in their recovery and maybe can take part in a few classes a week remotely. I think it can be valuable in addition to face to face treatment.

“I do believe it will carry on into the future, particularly in private practice, so have accepted that telerehab will be something I will be using in the longer term.”

For Tabitha, currently on a placement with neurological physio specialist PhysioFunction, telerehab is not the only big change from her expectations pre-pandemic.

“The use of PPE is something I have had to adapt to,” she admits.

“Every time you see a patient in person, you have to change gloves and thoroughly wash down equipment, to be compliant with the very high hygiene standards.

“This can be time consuming, and when you have back to back appointments I’ve found it can be quite stressful to ensure you’re doing everything you need to do in addition to your work with patients, but that’s something I’m learning as I go.

“Wearing a mask and visor isn’t always ideal for communication, but that’s something else I am finding gets better with time and use. Although it can be quite a juggle when you’re trying to treat a patient with one hand, and trying to stop your visor falling off with the other!”

Tabitha is based in the clinic four days a week, but has to work from home one day a week due to the need for a regular COVID-19 test, to ensure the safety of clients and colleagues alike.

“I have my COVID test every Monday, so I carry out consultations by Zoom that day, and providing my test comes back negative, I see patients in person Tuesday to Friday,” she says.

“I find the mix of telerehab and practical experience is really useful, especially as we are going to be using Zoom and the likes in the long term.”

Having had a previous placement cut short in April due to the pandemic, Tabitha is grateful she is able to get such experience, which accounts for vital clinical hours training for her degree course.

“Some of my year group were taken off their placements and have had to do everything virtually, so I’m lucky that I have been able to continue in a clinic,” she says.

“I’m still getting the same training, as aside from the PPE and new rules around social distancing, clients get the treatment they always have done so the practical work is the same.”

Tabitha is set to graduate in summer 2021 and has the experience of her studies, supported by three years of placements, to help her build a career in physiotherapy.

“In some ways this has been a really weird time to be working in physio, but in others it has been a very good time. This kind of experience prepares you for anything and everything, and the use of telerehab has shown me what it will be like in the future,” she adds.

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Case management

‘The challenges have been many, but we’ve found ways to overcome them’

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"The demand for digital technology going forward should mean that we can develop a better working practice"

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced huge changes within case management and the traditional ways in which clients have been supported. In our continuing series of Q&A features with case managers across the country, Martin Gascoigne of Neuro Case Management UK (NCMUK) shares his experiences.

Can you summarise how the past few months have been for you.

The past few months for NCMUK have been extremely challenging. This is due to the Government initially ring fencing all of the PPE supplies for NHS staff which made it very difficult for us to procure the necessary equipment. Also, due to our Paediatric Clients Parents furloughing, we have experienced different challenges with the type and level of care that they felt they would like us to provide whilst still working in accordance with National Minimum Standards.

How did you adapt to the restrictions of lockdown? Were you able to do this quickly or did it take a bit of time?

We managed to adapt to all of the new guidelines effective immediately as we were informed by the Government that failure to conform with these would mean that we were no longer able to deliver the care needed. NCMUK therefore reassigned staff to new roles to deal with the new daily/weekly challenges set, identifying new sources of equipment provision, medication and standards of care.

What have been the main challenges – were you able to overcome them?

The main challenges we found were that of procuring PPE at a clinical level. Unfortunately we could not identify or purchase any in the UK and so in order to overcome this it was necessary for us to establish a regular supplier overseas who was able to both meet our needs and the needs of our clients.

Has the use of telerehab been of benefit to you?

NCMUK has indeed benefited from digital technology including Zoom and Facetime. During this period of lockdown, telephone calls and digital contact was the only way the case managers/directors could maintain a high level of communication with our suppliers, clients and families.
At this time we also relied on a digital marketing organisation which made sure that our company stayed at number one on page one with Google. This meant that we could maintain our on line presence and as a result of this we would benefit from new referrals which continued to keep us busy.

How have your clients responded? Was it difficult for them to adapt to?

Our clients did find it difficult just understanding the pandemic initially, as we all did, with the obvious additional worries that they would be infected by our carers. This concern, however, was alleviated as the NCMUK team provided all care in a fully barriered manner using face masks, aprons, gloves and hand wash following the Government guidelines set.

Do you feel the lack of face-to-face contact with clients or/and colleagues has been damaging?

Our carers have been continuing to attend their home visits following the correct guidelines throughout the pandemic. This meant that they continued to have face to face contact. New links have been established via digital marketing and Zoom calls but this has been a positive addition to our communication network and as we already undertake telephone reviews with our staff, there was no change to our relationship with our colleagues.

How central do you think the use of telerehab will be for you going forward?

The demand for digital technology going forward should mean that we can develop a better working practice combining the face to face home visits and the human side of our meetings/assessments alongside digital meetings. This has the benefit of reducing the carbon emissions of our team, whose level of travel is reduced.

How do you think the future of case management has been shaped by the pandemic?

The NCMUK team will have the opportunity now to work more from home, allowing them to complete basic administrative tasks within their own environment, thus reducing emissions due to unnecessary travel.
It will also mean that when completing some assessments, these can be carried out via Zoom/Facetime meaning that more out of reach areas throughout the England/Wales can be contacted more easily. It has been necessary for us to think of alternative methods of communication moving forward and these will probably be maintained in the future as they have been a success.

Will you be doing anything differently within your business going forward, compared to your working practices pre-pandemic?

The pandemic has changed our business considerably as we are all now working more from home with the benefit of our staff reducing their overall carbon footprint. This will continue and streamline the industry as there will be more work undertaken on a virtual basis as staff are able to complete the basis administrative tasks within their own home environment in lieu of travelling to the office. It will also allow NCMUK to have clients referred to us who live in more inaccessible areas of the England/Wales which should provide more people access to more services.

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