Two of the most powerful ingredients of Accessible Dreams’ work are the very things that are restricted right now.

Travelling to exciting horizons, and being able to hang out with friends new and old once there, are at the heart of the experiences the group creates.

And at the time of writing, one is currently impossible from the UK, while the other is enabled only in a world of separation, screens and clever apps.

But Nicola Cale, who runs Accessible Dreams, sounds surprisingly chipper when NR Times calls her.

Partly, she’s been bowled over by the enthusiasm and ingenuity shown by people in the group’s vast social ecosystem in staying connected and supporting each other.

But also, it’s given her a chance to reflect on the importance of the organisation’s work – and she can’t wait to help more clients onto the adventure trail with renewed vigour soon.

Accessible Dreams welcomes people with serious injuries and often complex disabilities into life-changing overseas experiences, like skiing, surfing and safaris.

Many individuals it works with would otherwise have given up on the possibility of such adventures because of the challenges created by their condition or injury. In reversing this, magical things can happen.

Nicola, who runs the organisation alongside fellow director William Sargent, says: “Going out and being in a different environment stimulates the brain differently. Being on the mountains, for example, already changes your outlook, so if you have a brain injury or disability and your world’s become a lot smaller, to change your environment is really important.

“So too are the opportunities to socialise with others in a group which looks beyond disability.

“Making friends with other people who may be struggling with different challenges in life can be empowering and help clients to better deal with their own difficulties.”

​Through its annual trips, Accessible Dreams enables people to rediscover, or even discover for the first time, the social benefits of group travel and exploring the world alongside the challenge of the physical activity.

“The main thinking behind it is to show them that life can be good again. While a person might not be able to ski or surf in the same way they used to, we want to help them discover they can still do it.

“We’re not focusing on disability, we’re looking at what we can do, what can be possible. We want to show people that their dream is accessible and make adventures which are often assumed to be beyond reach become reality.”

Coronavirus travel restrictions unfortunately led to the group’s annual safari trip being postponed, although Nicola is hoping surfing can still take place later in
the year.

And, with skiing still scheduled for February and March 2021, planning and the search for new opportunities behind the scenes is in full flow.

The three services offered by Accessible Dreams – organised trips, helping people to plan their own holiday and supplying a crew member ‘chaperone’ to join a holiday – are still proving as in-demand as ever.

Despite all future travel being clouded in uncertainty, Nicola believes the current enforced isolation has only galvanised people in their desire to see more of the world.

“I have a theory, I can’t prove it, but it’s a theory of mine, that good brain chemistry can build new neural pathways. If you’re stressed and your daily routine
is the same all the time, you’re not making new connections in your brain, whereas if you’re going out doing new things, your senses are heightened.

“So it’s important that we continue to focus on that huge difference travelling can make and look to the future to get our plans back on track for later this year and next year onwards.

“Taking people on holiday, or using our resources and connections to help is absolutely something to look forward to and be excited about.”

Over the course of the many trips organised so far, Nicole has witnessed a steady stream of success stories from people who have fulfilled personal dreams, while changing their outlook on life.

On the most recent skiing trip, which saw 66 people visiting a French ski resort, a man who suffered a brain injury several years ago, which left him with very limited powers of communication, went skiing for the first time since his injury.

That huge achievement was compounded by the fact his support worker and friend was also able to join him.

“This particular guy used to be in the Army and we knew he was an adrenaline junkie before his brain injury.

“So we arranged for him to ski down the mountain in a sit ski. We found out that his support worker used to be in the military with him, so we arranged for him to go in a sit ski too.

“That was a special moment. It’s a cliché but you could see him light up, he was visibly brighter in his eyes, and also more upbeat afterwards.

“We also have a blind man who has now been on four ski trips with us and has learned to ski standing up. It’s incredible that he’s learned this new skill.

“That feeling of exhilaration, the speed and perception of danger – even though in reality it’s the safest it could be – has a really special impact on people.”

While the trips are primarily for the benefit of the person with the serious injury or disability, they can be equally important for family members and support workers too, says Nicola.

“You can see sometimes they’re a bit nervous about going on trips, so that’s why we offer the range of services we do, either arranging the holiday, helping to arrange someone’s own holiday, or having someone to send with you.

“Seeing a loved one being able to ski or surf and seeing the difference that makes to them, can be very emotional.

“I had one lady recently tell me that going on one of our trips with her son helped her to let go a little bit as a mother and to realise that people really did care – and that it was OK for her to take a step back. I thought that was brilliant.

“Her son also said about travelling as a group, ‘We went as strangers and came back as friends’ and that’s exactly what we want to achieve.

“We see it as building a community of people who have mutual experiences and common loves, and we have set up a WhatsApp group for people who are travelling so they can keep in touch afterwards. That’s been a really nice more recent addition to what we do.”

Each trip organised by Accessible Dreams is meticulously planned according to the bespoke needs of the participants.

“We want to take people to places that are unusual and appealing, but on a practical level, we make sure that whichever adventure we go on, there is a great hospital or medical centre nearby, and of course make sure the resort we go to meets our needs exactly.

“The ski resort in France we visit now knows us. They’ve got great resources, but we’ve also made sure their ski instructors are clued up on brain injury and have taught them about brain injury awareness.

“Also, we add in other aspects which are tailored for the group, such as having a rest day after a travel day.

“These are the sorts of things that package holidays don’t really factor in. So we might make a holiday for ten days instead of seven to allow some extra time getting over fatigue.”

Plans are also underway for trips, including those within the UK, that provide a more relaxing alternative to adrenaline-packed holidays.

Nicola is also hoping to arrange high-octane day trips as soon as the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

“If someone wanted to do a skydive, for example, we could look at that.

“There are also opportunities for cycling or walking holidays closer to home and we’ve got links to some adapted properties in the UK which could help with that.

“Also, we ran a fantastic ‘sensation’ vacation to France, with some alternative therapists joining us.

“We had good food, aromatic essential oils and all kinds of other things that indulged the senses of taste, touch and smell. That’s something we could look at doing in the UK once we’re allowed to move around again.”

Accessible Dreams has long been in the business of overcoming seemingly unscalable barriers. It looks like the current crisis will be just another challenge it rises to and ultimately leaves for dust on the road to another adventure.