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Looking on the bright side

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Game changing neuro-rehab opportunities are emerging as a result of the coronavirus crisis, argues health and social care investment expert Boda Gallon.

The Impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has been multi layered. Yes, we’re faced with a fragmented health and social care system, continued uncertainty, and a gloomy economic outlook. There are, however, positive opportunities for investment and service redesign within NR and the wider specialist healthcare marketplace.

Increased investment interest for this most resilient of sectors, combined with a clearly identified need for positive change, should drive the creativity needed to embrace opportunities and deliver the much needed integration, improved productivity and efficiency of services across health and social care.

This positive outlook, however, still comes with a need to understand changes in our behaviour, to embrace change, to break down cultural barriers and focus on opportunity planning.

All of which is much easier said than done. A key lesson that has been brought home to us during the Covid-19 pandemic is that heroes are people. Ordinary, but extraordinary, people.

Once we get past fighting fires and lockdown fever most experts agree that things will never be the same. The key reason for this can be found in our primal brain and how we act and continue to live under a state of fear.

The neuroscientific term for this is “a somatic marker,” as coined by Antonio Damasio. I believe that Covid-19 is a negative somatic marker that we’ve
all had installed in our brains over the past several months and is likely to have a powerful, lasting impact on how we behave, but also a positive impact on the aspects of the cultural changes required for the health and social care marketplace to develop.

Change needs to go deeper, and Covid-19, as our generation’s negative somatic marker, is probably the best reason to change we will ever witness.

Covid-19 could also finally be the catalyst for the political will required to drive the full integration and parity between health and social care. It is no real surprise to find the recent disclosure of Camilla Cavendish’s plans that social care could be brought under the control of the NHS to honour Boris Johnson’s pledge to “fix the crisis in social care”.

This will also present opportunities and require new ways of working for people, but this will ultimately drive better and more seamless service experiences for all our patients, clients, residents, customers and consumers.

We are going to find ourselves in an entirely new online environment, with an entire generation of consumers and service commissioners expecting to interact via screens and having the aspiration and confidence of services being delivered in a ‘Covid-19 free’ environment.

This new virtual hybrid world will need to be delivered with empathy to help everyone overcome the negative Covid-19 somatic marker and still meet the basic human needs for relationships, touch and social interaction.

The perceived threat of Covid-19 does not mean that new services cannot be launched or repositioned. The opportunity is to develop more flexible services able to meet all the new behavioural, political, and environmental drivers of the ‘Covid-19 game changer’.

Providers and their people need to respond to this opportunity and reposition from fighting fires and coping around how things have always been, to repositioning ahead of the curve and innovating services towards what will be a new normal.

Digital transformation

To date the adoption of digital technology to help improve productivity and efficiency across the system has often faced multiple cultural barriers, with people often sabotaging initiatives as they either feel their role, profession or revenue streams are threatened.

Covid-19 has forced everyone to look at the current barriers in a virtual way and employ different ways of working. Hopefully, this perceived threat now presents a clear opportunity for providers and professionals to deliver complimentary and long-term hybrid solutions for their clients and staff teams that embrace the best of digital and face to face interventions, training and support.

The delivery of community rehab has always faced productivity and efficiency challenges relating to logistics and the supply of and access to suitably skilled professionals, especially in more rural and harder to reach communities.

The proposed long-term somatic marker of Covid-19 now requires services and providers to be nimble to create longer term holistic solutions of their own, coordinating the much- fragmented array of technology options.

There is a need to embrace AR/VR/AI/IOT and to learn from and adopt best practice solutions from the UK and abroad to ensure much-needed efficiency, productivity and value are provided at the same time.

The positive outcome of this burgeoning digital transformation, like Covid-19, is also multi layered.

Offering a renewed focus on flexible working, employee support, management and an array of ‘wellbeing’ opportunities for staff recruitment and retention.

Healthcare settings

This digital transformation is most keenly required to help support and shape the future of various healthcare settings.

Existing commissioning and strategic planning intentions were already focused on provision away from hospitals and more institutional environments towards community settings with more holistic and social models of care.

The impact of Covid-19 will now hopefully see this process accelerated.

Although the wider roll-out of Covid-19 testing and potential vaccines is critical, providers need to review how the design and operation of care homes can be focused on delivering a ‘Covid-19 free’ moniker.

Enlightened providers need to ensure that cross infection mitigation and the flow of people, process and supplies are given an increased priority. The ability to offer digital triage and re-establish a more effective working relationship with GPs and primary care is essential to plan both avoidable admissions to and discharges from hospital and to provide the level of clinical support that has so often been missing during this pandemic.

Repositioning care homes from what has been perceived as the riskiest place for people to be towards being the safest environment possible has to be a clear goal; as well as a PR opportunity.

A focus on delivering flexible and safe space within residential services is essential to provide for increased independence, community and family integration and improved social inclusion.

New building designs in development need to respond to this now, and existing services will need to take a more strategic review of their estate for the medium and longer terms.

New models of care already seeking to deliver coordinated pathways from hospital to home, need the potential integration of health and social care to truly flourish and develop, but the vision must not stop there.

The extended integration and creative use of housing options is essential along with digital transformation to maximise potential clinical and financial outcomes and deliver the best quality of life for people. There is a lot to be learned from each other.

Previously fragmented sectors need to look vertically up and down patient pathways and supply chains, flex their services, upskill and share staff, embrace elements of isolated good practice and design into their own facilities and services.

Embrace the somatic change

To maximise value together, disruptive innovation driven by Covid-19 needs to be embraced. The independent sector can fully support NHS strategy by complimenting the NHS and building on the many successful collaborative partnerships developed during this pandemic.

Significant public goodwill and the potential political momentum to finally drive health and social care integration can now be leveraged to force past the multiple barriers to change.

Opportunity exists for game changers willing to take advantage of keen investor interest for a market that has proven to be the most resilient in the face of a global pandemic.

This inward investment into our sector can only be a further benefit forcing much needed change, new competition and opportunity to drive service innovation.

Ultimately and most importantly this will deliver better impacts and outcomes for service users, their families, and our colleagues.

We cannot afford to stand still and need to respond to the wider behavioural impacts of Covid-19 to reposition services, partnerships and networks to ensure new models of care and rehabilitation are (re)designed and delivered in more flexible and digital enabled environments.

This will ensure that proactive providers can truly respond to the future needs of customers, service commissioners and an emerging new normal to deliver even stronger, sustainable business models.

Proactive and future proofed business models are what any Investor from owner operators, to specialist private equity and bank funders will be looking to support and develop.

Hopefully, this article will help stimulate some debate and more ideas so we can share best practice and experience together.

Boda Gallon is a health and social care consultant. Connect with him via www.bodagallon.com

Read more expert commentary from Boda here

 

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Learn more about virtual reality in rehab

Event is an opportunity to hear from expert Dr Katherine Dawson, Consultant Clinical Neuropsychologist.

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An event later this month will give neuro-rehab professionals an opportunity to learn more about the use of virtual reality in the field. 

The virtual webinar, on 26th January at 1.20pm to 2.30pm, features an in-depth talk by Dr Katherine Dawson, Consultant Clinical Neuropsychologist.

A Guide to Virtual Reality, which can be booked by emailing training@thinktherapy1st.co.uk, will cover:

– Growth of digital health

– Virtual Reality(VR) / Telerehabilitation evidence base

– Virtual tour of the Brain Recovery Zone VR platform

– Where does the Brain Recovery Zone sit in a clinical pathway

– Clinical outcomes, case studies, and research trial

Dr. Katherine Dawson has over 15 years experience working in various rehabilitation settings (both within the NHS and private sector) with individuals who have a wide range of neurological conditions.

She has a particular interest in cognitive rehabilitation, and working with individuals and families to manage emotional and behavioural changes following Acquired Brain Injury (ABI).

She is currently involved in research with the NHS regarding ABI and telerehabilitation, and has recently published a book exploring adjustment to brain injury from the perspectives of clients, family members and clinicians. 

In December 2017, Katherine set up a local neuro-rehab service (Sphere Rehab) with her business partner, focusing on community integration post ABI. She also co-founded the Brain Recovery Zone neuro rehab Virtual Reality platform in the summer of 2019. The team are commissioned by several local CCGs and also work within the private sector.

Ahead of the event, she said: “I just wanted to say a massive thank you to Think Therapy 1st for inviting me to talk about VR and the Brain Recovery Zone. Virtual Reality has great potential in neuro rehab – both to ‘up’ the dosage of rehab, in addition to promoting ongoing engagement and self management.

“I am really looking forward to delivering this webinar and discussing some of the clinical outcomes including the work completed together with Think Therapy 1st and other clients.”

Helen Merfield, Managing Director, Think Therapy 1st, which is organising the event, said: “I am really excited about our VR event we have used Dr Dawson on a number of cases with amazing results and her VR really has changed lives.

“So much so that we are partnering with her company Sphere as a preferred provider for both VR through Brain Recovery Zone and Clinical and Neuro psychology. Close working ties can only improve outcomes which for both our companies are already impressive.”

To register for the event email training@thinktherapy1st.co.uk.

 

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Neuropsychology

Sport and exercise ‘have key role in mental health and wellbeing’

The Moving for Mental Health report highlights the role of physical activity in supporting mental resilience and recovery

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Physical activity and sport can play a key role in supporting mental health and wellbeing and helping people to recover from the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report has concluded. 

The Moving for Mental Health report includes better training for health professionals to prescribe movement as a means of effectively tackling the vast growth in people experiencing mental health issues. 

Produced following the onset of the pandemic, the report sets out evidence that developing a healthy relationship with physical activity and being involved in linked programmatic interventions and social networks is beneficial, can improve people’s mental health and wellbeing, and help tackle social isolation.

The project, by the Sport for Development Coalition and Mind, highlights how COVID-19 has exposed the weaknesses of single-sector responses to addressing complex mental health problems and tackling growing health inequalities. 

The report recommends physical activity and community sport be further embedded in health policy and integrated care systems while calling for an enhanced role for experts by experience and diverse communities leading in the design, implementation and evaluation of future strategy and programming.

Launched at an online meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Sport, it is also designed to support and inspire public bodies, funders, commissioners and policy-makers as well as community-based programme providers aiming to enhance the impact of movement for mental health.

Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind, said: “While Mind’s research suggests that half of adults and young people have relied on physical activity to cope during the pandemic, we also know that physical activity levels for people with long-term health conditions, including mental health problems, have declined. 

“Considering how vital physical activity is for many people’s mental health, it is clear that we need a collective effort to reach those who need support the most.”

Andy Reed, chair of the Sport for Development Coalition, said: “This report is aimed at supporting and informing policy-makers about how we can maximise the contribution of targeted sport and physical activity-based interventions at this crucial time.”

The research was led by a team of academic researchers from Edge Hill University and Loughborough University, and draws on evidence and submissions from over 70 organisations including sport and mental health organisations, public bodies and Government departments.

Andy Smith, professor of sport and physical activity at Edge Hill University, said: “The impact of Covid-19 on people’s mental health and wellbeing cannot be overstated. 

“It has brought to light the significant mental health inequalities which existed prior to COVID-19, but which have since worsened further, especially among those living in under-served and low-income communities. 

“Our research is calling on the Government and other public bodies to invest in the provision of movement opportunities for mental health across multiple policy sectors, and to use the evidence presented as a basis for making more effective policy decisions which benefit everyone’s mental health and which tackle deep-seated inequalities.”

Moving for Mental Health is the first policy report in a series being published throughout 2022 by the Coalition and relevant partners. The reports are aimed at maximising the contribution of targeted sport-based interventions to helping ‘level up’ communities facing disadvantage and deprivation and tackling deep-seated health and societal inequalities which have been exacerbated by COVID-19.

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Calvert Trust announces new trustees

Louise Dunn, Judith Gate, Emily Flynn and Victoria Notman bring their expertise to the Trust, which also runs Calvert Reconnections

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The Lake District Calvert Trust (LDCT), which runs brain injury rehabilitation centre Calvert Reconnections, has started 2022 by announcing the appointment of four new trustees.

Louise Dunn, Judith Gate, Emily Flynn and Victoria Notman will bring their respective expertise to supporting the further development of the charity and its vital services.

Louise Dunn

Louise Dunn is a communications consultant and academic with over 25 years’ experience of management and leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry and at Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust and Charity.

Commenting on her appointment, Louise said: “As a Keswick resident, I’m delighted to be able to get involved with this extraordinary organisation, that has such a positive impact for people living with disabilities in our community and all over the UK.

“I am looking forward to learning more about how I can help the team and contributing to their exciting plans for the future.”

Judith Gate has extensive experience in the charity and public sectors including leading the volunteering and customer care functions for a national charity.

She currently leads a continuous improvement programme with a focus on delivering efficiency and improved customer experience through business process improvement and digital transformation.

Judith Gate

Judith said: “I applied to be trustee because I wanted to use my skills to deliver as much positive impact as possible. As an outdoor enthusiast I feel a genuine connection to the Calvert Trust‘s mission of making outdoor activity accessible to everyone

“I am really excited to join the board and look forward to using my knowledge and experience to help support the Trust achieve its ambitions over the coming years.”

Emily Flynn has over 21 years’ experience as a military officer and communications-electronics engineer across a wide spectrum of business areas including: senior leadership/board-level management; digital optimisation; resource planning; engineering, operations and risk management; trusteeship; and mountaineering leadership.

Commenting on her appointment, Emily said: “I am delighted to become a trustee of the Lake District Calvert Trust.

“The military introduced me to the benefits of outdoor education as a means of expanding personal confidence and stretching comfort zones in a controlled environment. It also led me to become a mountaineer.

“I hope to be able to bring my previous experience as a leader, mountaineer, engineer and trustee to help the Calvert Trust

Emily Flynn

continue to deliver amazing outdoor education to its participants and to help it grow over the next few years.”

Victoria Notman is legal director at the employment team at Burnetts Solicitors in Carlisle and has over 20 years’ experience as an employment lawyer.

She also has a first-class honours degree in physiotherapy and experience in the rehabilitation and development of adults and young people with mild to severe physical and mental impairments and learning needs.

Victoria said: “I am looking forward to applying my knowledge and skills to become integrated into the fabric of the Trust to such a degree that all the experience I have to offer can really make a difference to the lives and happiness of those accessing Calvert Lakes and Calvert Reconnections.”

Welcoming the charity’s new trustees, Giles Mounsey-Heysham, chairman of the LDCT Trustees, said: “After a detailed recruitment process, we are delighted to welcome our new Trustees.

Victoria Notman

“Together they bring a wealth of skills, experience and shared passion to the Lake District Calvert Trust. We welcome their contributions moving forward.”

The Lake District Calvert Trust has been supporting people with disabilities from its specialist Calvert Lakes residential centre and accessible riding centre near Keswick in the Lake District for almost 45 years.

Calvert Lakes has grown from being the UK’s first dedicated activity centre for people with disabilities, to welcoming around 3,500 visitors to stay each year.

These include individuals, family groups, specialist schools, accessible sports clubs, disability charity groups, supported living organisations and care homes across the UK.

Last year, the charity also opened Calvert Reconnections, the UK’s first residential brain injury rehabilitation programme combining traditional clinical therapies with physical activity in the outdoors.

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