But it’s not just outpatients that have seen a change. One neuropsychologist in York is trying to sustain momentum with her support group, but navigating the new online world with patients has brought its challenges.

Just before lockdown, Diana Toseland, consultant clinical neuropsychologist, was celebrating. Her charity, Café Neuro York, became officially registered. Café Neuro is a social support network that allows people with long term neurological conditions in York to learn new skills, help others and learning to be mindful, after they’re discharged from health services.

Group members were meeting face-to-face for morning and evening meetings, and once a month on Thursday evenings there was an interactive presentation for members to enjoy. When lockdown began, Toseland wanted to continue her twice-weekly sessions online.

But adjusting hasn’t been easy – Toseland had built up a loyal user base, but sessions were very much based offline. Adjusting hasn’t been easy.

“People need this in York. People with a neurological condition need ongoing support,” Toseland says. “People with brain injuries found it helpful to come along to meet people without having to explain – they can just be who they are. It’s about what people can do, not about their condition or disability.

Since lockdown, Toseland has been struggling to know how to support people.

“I’ve got up to speed with Zoom. This week we had six people call in, but their difficulties are quite profound and they’re finding it hard to get onto Zoom. Some call in late because they forget or find it difficult, others call in with help from families.”

 

Toseland has found there are many technical difficulties to overcome before the sessions can begin.

“You need so many things – good internet connection, distraction-free environment, working microphones and speakers.

“One woman managed to set it up herself, her career before the injury was IT, but then she didn’t have sound. Then she tried headphones, which worked, but then she took them off and couldn’t get the microphone on the computer to work without the headphones – she was the most successful in that meeting.

“Another has poor signal so she has to sit under a tree in her garden, which means she can only do it when the weather’s good.”

Once the call is up and running, Toseland says some members find it difficult to navigate the conversation, which has entirely different unspoken social rules than offline conversations.

“They’ve found it difficult because you can’t have two people having a conversation, it’s got to be one person at a time, which requires intense concentration. People can’t sustain that level of attention long enough to fully participate in the conversation.

“Some go quiet, it leaves people with headaches, it’s fraught with disaster. They might dominate the conversation and not pick up on cues; one finds it’s too much stimulation, so she closes her eyes.”

But Toseland hopes to continue the groups, as when it does work, it works well.

“On the other hand, for those who have joined it, they’ve used it as a bit of a lifeline.”

But Toseland is looking forward to getting meetings back into the real world. She’s been runnin Café Neuro for over a year and a half, and she’s seen more progress in some members than they ever made coming to her clinical practice.

“It’s made a difference in ways I couldn’t have predicted, and an impact wider and quicker than I could’ve possibly hoped for,” she says.